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, and which prohibited commonsense uses of cheap and safe fuel that could actually help the environment. and department of transportation regulations that, without increasing safety, vastly increased record eping for ready-mix concrete drivers, unnecessarily limited their hours and suppressed their wages. title 2 of the alert act helps to protect people like bob sells and his workers from regulations that ask job creators to achieve the unyou a cheeveble. do not -- the unachievable, do not help to control targets, suppress hours and wages for no good reasons and inundate americans with unnecessary paperwork. title 3 of the alert act offers long-needed help to small business people like carl harris, the vice president and general manager of carl harris company in wichita, kansas. mr. harris is a small homebuilder. every day he has to fight and overcome the fact that government regulations now account for 25% of the final price of a new single-family home. mr. harris participants in small business review panels, existing law uses to try to lower the cost of regulations for small businesse
, effectively? >> well, it's hard. it's going to be a significant trading range environment. the market will correct back on a repeating basis. we'll get a period where the market doesn't accomplish a heck of a lot. that's all you should expect. >> you watched janet yellen yesterday. did he provide the confidence that you would have wanted? and the reason i ask is because historically, if you just do the math, every time we get a new chair in this role, we usually have some form of a correction within six months. and the question that i keep wondering is whether we have that correction or it's still to come. >> i think, you know, investors tend to react to the unexpected, not the expected. and yesterday, the messaging was steady as she goes. so i think for now, we're in good shape. the march meeting, unless data falls off the cliff, investors will expect and will treat another $10 billion in tapering to occur. so i think we hand off from bernanke to yellen in this case may be a little different. because she was pretty much on tune with the dovishness of the fed and there hasn't been a f
environment we heard about how a lot of the coverage around elections wasn't particularly polarized. there are undoubtedly concerns around the future of where this is going to be. fragile my work is on states in general. fragile states tend to be fractured state. and we are seeing an increase in the fragmented and fractured media in afghanistan and the most fractured part of that getting quiteably significant injections of funding at the moment. if the last length -- it is the that isng for a state trying to chart its own national identity -- it is not necessarily a useful way of going. but as the media -- but the media is becoming ever more fractured and fragile. >> how solid do you think is the support that you expect to see in terms ofection governmental support for the concept of a free media? i know there was discussion recently about freedom of the press in afghanistan. >> again, when you compare it to other countries, afghanistan has had a remarkable -- has managed to create a remarkable space of freedom of media. this is because -- we should give credit to president karzai .
expanding. the markets are going to find the environment stuff. what is the concern china or deflation? >> i don't think there will be deflation and i think we will see a long time of low growth. i don't think inflation will be a problem. of alarm also it's bells and i like to put the word demand in front of deflation. and thatalling wages means following command and a negative spiral. it is not just falling prices. is lots of sectors. you see groups and things like that. falling realu have wages that that is the problem. the cycle that japan went through and if you do not touch it at the right time, it is difficult to turn around. are we in a scenario like that? deflation and the specter of it hanging over us unless handled correctly. >> one of the characteristics of japan that contributed to the slow growth was a rapidly-aging population and people having a lower propensity to consume. that changed the balance of growth in the economy. there are european economies that have rapidly aging populations and it appears to be a social issue and an issue that has a profound economic impact and lo
supply of hundreds of thousands of people. finally we must be mindful of the environment. first we operate in a time of severe budget constraints. as secretary of the department of homeland security, i therefore believe i am obligated to identify and eliminate inefficiencies, waste and unnecessary duplications of resources across the large and de-centralized bureaucracy, while pursuing important missions such as the recapitalization of the aging coast guard fleet. second, i am mindful of the surveys that reflect that morale is low. i intend to constantly remind our work force of the critical importance of their homeland security mission and that the department's greatest asset in pursuit of these mission is his our people. i will be a champion for the men and women of d.h.s., and i will advocate on their behalf. i look forward to working with this committee. the chairman is correct that i am actively working to fill the vacancies in senior management positions. i do that on a daily basis, and i look forward to a shared vision and a partnership with congress on our important mission
dispute settlement procedures and rules and enforcement of new obligations upon environment and labor. now, let me turn very quickly to the ttip negotiations. i have a little lesson that i can say on this because they are at an earlier stage of negotiations. though they are also important because the transatlantic economic relationship is our most significant commercial relationship. it's not our most significant trade partnership. the tpp actually is more valuable in that front, but we are talking about over a trillion dollars of two-way trade in goods and services between the united states and the european union, and over $4 trillion in foreign direct investment in each other's market. so it is a huge, huge adventure. the ttip negotiators seek to eliminate tariffs and substantial reduce nontariff barriers in trade and investment. that's a traditional part of the agenda. but as miriam noted, there's also ambitious goals with regard to coordinating or harmonizing regulatory policies affecting trade in goods and services. and that's what the biggest payoff could come very hard to estimate t
in a safe environment. more than a change in government, we want a true change in the country. we don't want to live in other countries, we want to change venezuela. >> tens of thousands of opposition supporters rallied across the capital in a large display of unrest. sunday's march through the capital was overwhelmingly peaceful. later hundreds engaged in standoffs with the police. it did not reach levels of violence seen at other protests. >> president nicolas maduro cracked down hard at the protest. there has been fatalities and dozens injured and arrested. the governments have been holding peace talks. the opposition and many gaoled. >> this is the annual carnival weekend. under different circumstances most of the people protesting will be sitting on the beach. they can't celebrate when many have been killed or taken prisoner. >> nicolas maduro gave people two extra days off for carnival. so far it has not worked. people have brought the beach to the protest. . >> translation: the people are calling for deep political change and it doesn't get that venezuela woke up. it's demanding human
in any business environment, to grow their business they're looking to latin america, asia, africa, parts of the world that are still developing, and where smoking unlike here in the united states, not frowned upon at all but extremely popular. >> john, it's interesting, we were talking about this a bit earlier, it will be curious to see what walgreen's does next. it seems to me that a decision like this from cvs puts all kinds of pressure on the 23,478 one, walgreen's, to make a similar decision. >> reporter: i think that's absolutely right. you have to remember that walgreen's is the number one player in this particular market. and they have issued a statement today in which they have said we al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> jose's death is part of wh
decided that he would try to answer that question and he runs this environment will help program and collected sippy cups from and sentnd toys "r" us them to an independent lab in texas to be tested. he found out in fact roughly 1/3 of them did contain estrogen-like chemicals. >> in that pink sippy cup? >> his daughter's sippy cup was reaching estrogenic chemicals. his fears were founded. >> what can i do to her? >> this is the big question. we know a lot about bpa. it is one of the most of the chemicals on the planet. and we know these chemicals generally are associated with a range of negative health effects. but the specific effect of any slightlymical varies from chemical to chemical. we actually don't know what chemical is leaching out of that sippy cup. it is impossible to know. there is a high correlation with rest cancer -- with breast cancer. other specific diseases vary from chemical to chemical. michael green, the way he describes it as an implant science experiment that we are on our families all of the time. >> we're going to take a break and then come back to this d
or the environment. that is an important point to be made. that is the argument being used against keystone. host: he also asked you about unemployment insurance. guest: i am open to that. we offered a bill that we would be really -- we would be willing to support. we put forward alternatives that i have supported and republicans would support. we have to make sure that as we passed legislation we are addressing the deficit and the debt. a 17.2 trillion dollar debt. we have to address that for future generations. to a caller from alaska, anchorage, alaska. patrick, republican line. you are on was senator hoven. caller: good morning. thank you for the washington journal. it is a very valuable resource for us. senator hoven, i have two questions. because of the previous caller, i wanted to clarify one point regarding private and public oil out of alaska. governor hickle saw to it that we became an owner states. much closer to that oil being private oil than it is public. the oil companies appear are telling us that the reason there is only 500,000 barrels a day going down the pipe is because structure
promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ but if you cholose your eyes does it always feel like nothing's aged at all ♪ ♪ and if you close your eyes does it almost feel like ♪ >>> time now for cramer and "stop trading" jim. >> the idea that craft beer may have peaked and going back to buds, people are bud izzing abo that. boston beer numbers is not what we expected, this sam. and anheuser-busch, inbev, grade number turnaround in brazil and mexico, huge places that drink beer. is it a trend that can continue? if boston beer wants to spend less money they can show better gross margins. but this deal worked out. and worked out for constellation. the beer market's good. i don't want to make too much of the idea that craft beer has peaked but people will reach that conclusion. >> spirits taking a lot of share overall. >> diagio reported a quarter that was not so hot and the stock came back. if people want to take a real close look at boston beer they're no
environment that is going to affect brazil and chile. as a geopolitical matter, the united states and it's relationships with south america are at risk. the oil problem is a big one. if venezuela should really go essentially belly up, that is going to--that could raise oil prices for a while to $5 to $10 a barrel. >> first of all, brazil one of the countries we've talked about for several years now as being on an economic growth terror, that's not the case. it's growth has slowed and it will grow a little less or about the same as the united states in 2014. it will start to have an impact on the world. there is a real domino affect if latin america becomes a problem. what is the effect to the rest of us? >> it's probably pretty contained. i think argentina, the reason why we're concerned about brazil is we think argentina is really going to go down. in its economy, and in its politics. and argentina buys a lot from brazil and chile, so both of those countries are going to suffer in their economy. brazil has other problems. you put it together, and you got a chunk of latin america in trou
governmengovernment s have been suspended for more than a year. >>> officials at japan's environment ministry say an unexpected earthquake and tsunami off the country's pacific coast could produce up to $350 million tons of debris. that's about 11 times the amount from the march 2011 disaster. the estimate covers a quake and tsunami along the so-called nankai trough. the officials came up with the figure after studying disaster scenarios involving possible large quakes. they then estimated the volume of debris and simulated disposal based on the 2011 quake and tsunami in northeastern japan. they say getting rid of the debris from such a disaster could take between 11 and 19 years. >>> a fisherman's group in japan is demanding to know what caused the latest spill of highly radioactive water at the crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear plant. the group says last week's leak is causing them grave concern. officials at the national federation of fisheries cooperative associations submitted a written request to vice industry minister kazuyoshi akaba and urged him to launch a swift investigation. fisherme
is confronting a new regulatory environment, and we have our banks against the wall confronting audit as well as our stockholders. >> right. lou: by the end of the year, what kind of economy here? how much growth? we saw the fourth quarter revise again. what do you think it will be this year? >> i think by the end of the year we're going to be a solid 3%. that kind of assumes that all the pieces fall in to place. lou: yeah. there's that caveat. we appreciate it. greg miller, sun trust. we're delighted to see you. >> my pleasure. >>> up next lou dobbs to be the. we're going hollywood. stay with us. >>> a record-breaking year at the box office films bringing in all-time high 10.9 billion last year, and now they're looking to take home hollywood's top honor sunday. here to break down the top oscar contenders and likely winners is host of the television show -- great to see you. >> great to see you, too. >> let's start with "gravity." i find the movie a fascinating idea. the great stars. does it win best picture? >> it certainly is considered one of the runner of-up for best picture. out in inter
attempt. >> and a delicate balancing act between the environment and economy at lake tahoe. >> and a live look tonight from the top of mount tam you'll see how wet weather improved outlook for water supply. good evening. this next round of rain isn't a strong storm, but every drop counts in a drought, obviously. spencer? >> you're right. and we're counting many drops w. you can see light rainfall now. you can see that right here in the san francisco area from san francisco and south we have a steady rainfall at the moment. giving you the looping radar, you can see batches of rain beginning and continuing i should saying to move into our direction. nearly 4-tenths in mount st. helena. again, rain continues throughout the evening and overnight hours the totals will grow and we'll have totals later. >> the storm isn't looking like a big rain maker but last two were stronger and wetter. wayne freedman joins us with a look. >> people have been hearing about the drought. bad
lived most of my life in this city, but being in this beautiful environment and that beautiful environment is different. it is not half bad. >> very politic. that's move on the big investment banks, from citigroup to jpmorgan, bracing for a slump in the first quarter that is not citigroup says that trading revenue will probably drop. the jpmorgan ceo, jamie dimon, said last week that revenue from fixed income is down 15%. putting this into perspective for us, joining us by phone, jason goldberg. jason, how much of this is priced in? >> we think a lot of it is. we think that we will see trading results coming out from citigroup and j.p. morgan. you see it every day in the marketplace in terms of volume. ,aybe lower than anticipated investors and risk mode for the last few weeks. >> you make a nice distinction this morning about the venezuela laws. volume, as youh mentioned? or is this about something that went wrong? >> alternately it tends to be a terms ofng quarter in trading. if you look at the linked quarter basis, we still think it will be up 25%, 35%. most banks are just c
. to remain, it needs to adopt to a rapidly changing commercial environment. >> as well as cutting costs and changing itself, the airline is pushing for a change in the way its regulated. australian's government has been considered lifting restrictions on foreigners with a majority stake in the airline. the country wants the government to garb tee its debts with change from within and a change in regulation, quantity at us management thinks they can help the airline fly high once again. >> you are watching the aljazeera news hour. we have more to come, including the crisis in ukraine, plus the secret files of yanukovych, we reveal the contents of thousands of documents which could incriminate the former president. >> real madrid take a big step toward the quarter finals. details coming up. >> these protestors have decided that today they will be arrested >> these people have chased a president from power, they've torn down a state... >> what's clear is that people don't just need protection, they need assistance. al jazeera america. we open up your world. >> here on america tonight, an o
regulatory environment, and we have our banks against the wall confronting audit as well as our stockholders. >> rht. lou: by the end of the year, what kind of economy here? how much growth? we saw the fourth quarter revise again. what do you think it will be this year? >> i think by the end of the year we're going to be a solid 3%. that kind of assumes that all the pieces fall in to place. lou: yeah. there's that caveat. we appreciate it. greg miller, sun trust. we're delighted to see you. >> my pleasure. >>> up next lou dobbs to be the. we're going hollywood. stay with us. if you've got copd like me... ...hey breathing's hard. know the feeng? copd includes emphysema and chronic bronitis. spiriva is a oncdailinhaled copd maintenance treatment that helps open my obstructed airways for a full 24 hours. spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medici
environment, and he had a mum and he had grandparents and teachers who looked out for him. his view was if every child - they should have the opportunities he had. we all have a responsibility to make sure we provide that to them, and there are examples of programs that are working, improving the young men, the boy's lives, putting them on a positive trajectory, and we should put them to scale. it's good, not just for moral reasons, but it's good for the economy. they are the workforce for tomorrow. >> you talk about what is good for the economy and important for business, you will need the partnership of business. this is an initiative funded not by the federal government. >> the president said it's not a big federal government program. we shouldn't require additional resources, we should be smarter about how to use the resources and make sure they support programs that work and create incentives. this responsibility comes down on the business community. they can provide summer jobs, internship, mentorship, funding of not for profit organizations such as becoming a man. when you li
is he lived in a forgiving environment. he had a mom and teachers and adults who looked out for him. his hope was that these young men would have the chances that he had. programs that are improving these boys' lives amount putting them on -- and putting them on a positive trajectory, so we can touch many, many more men and do what we know will work. that's good not just for moral reasons but that it's good for our economy. they are our workforce of tomorrow and we hav should inven them. >> you talk about what's important for economy and business and you will need the cooperation of business. >> the president said this is not another big federal program. in fact we shouldn't require additional resources. we should be smarter about how we use the resources that we do have. we should make sure that the funds that we have are going to support programs that work and creating incentives for programs that work. but this responsibility comes down on the business community. and they have responsibility. they can provide summer jobs. internships, mentorship, funding of not for profit provide thes
of dollars to improve the environment these children are living in and contain malnutrition, that becomes more difficult as new syrian refugees arrive in lebanon everyday. and i'm with al jazeera, the valley in lebanon. >> reporter: al jazeera continues to demand the immediate release of the staff being held in egypt, mohamed fahmy and peter greste and baher mohamed are accused of having links with a terrorist organization and al jazeera rejects the charges and from the arabic channel has been held since august and on hunger strike for more than a month to protest against his imprisonment. bin-laden's son goes on trial and he is the highest part of al-qaeda to be prosecuted in a civilian court and we have more. >> and he was more than bin-laden's son-in-law and he was the top spokesman and saying more attacks was coming and 12 years later he is about to go on trial in new york city, one of the first people allegedly linked to september 11th to face the u.s. justice system and his lawyer says authorities are prosecuting the wrong man. >> he is charged with this conspiracy to murder americ
of the environment in which we pursue all these missions. first we operate in a time of severe budget constraints. as secretary of the department of homeland security, i therefore believe i am obligated to identify and eliminate inefficiencies, waste and unnecessary duplications of resources across dhs' large and decentralized beurocracy while pursuing important missions such as the recap tallization of the aging coast guard fleet. second, i am mindful of the surveys that reflect that morale is low within various components of dhs. i intend to remind our workforce of the importance of their homeland security mission and that the department's greatest asset in the pursuit of these missions is our people. i will be a champion for the men and women of dhs, and i will advocate on their behalf. i look forward to working with this committee. the chairman is correct that i am actively working to full the vacancies in senior management positions. i do that on a daily basis. i look forward to a shared vision and a partnership with congress on our important mission. thank you. >> thank you, secretary. i be
that creates an environment where investment and innovation and competition can thrive, the american people benefit. we've seen it in the wireless industry, we're seeing it in the broadband industry and the story of the media marketplace over the last 40 years since we last adopted our media rules has been one where competition has flourished. i think that's something the fcc would do well to remember when it steps into this marketplace. >> i'll tell you, sir, i mean i'm glad you're there and you're doing the lord's work. but whether it's broadband issues or the old fairness doctrine, the fcc is on the wrong side of every issue. you talk about innovation and entrepreneurship, you're right, god bless. the fcc on the wrong side, the ftc, all these independent agencies. i say get rid of them. >> part of the frustration that you have with agency comes into sharp relief when it comes to the media because we do have a core first amendment freedom. so when you combine the way that the study was created with that core fcc freedom -- first amendment freedom, i think people do rightly get concerned.
policy, environment, economics, all that goes beyond the front tears of nations of europe. that has to be done on the european level. we are doing that. >> give me a concrete example of something you're proud of, that the european parliament has done in the last five years? >> security, assistance in times of crisis, energy policy and security of gas deliveries, that's what we do. >> how has that worked better on a european level than it would with your country, poland saying, right, this is where we'll get our energy. >> if you put together your reserves, if you negotiate together and bargain on behalf of the bigger group of countries, you're much stronger, you get better prices, better conditions. >> let me ask you a question. you mentioned foreign policy there. you just got back from ukraine. that's our top story here on bbc world today, the crisis in ukraine. first of all, a european parliamentary delegation going to kiev, what can you hope to achieve? you don't have particular weight in terms of foreign policy. it was the foreign ministers last week who were on the ground doing
environment with you. what have you told the court in this plea, this desperate plea, to keep your 6-year-old granddaughter? >> i've told them that he's a convicted felon, i've told them that he offered her to me for sale. during a phone conversation with him. he said when he was in tacoma holding facility, immigration holding facility prior to his deportation, he said that he would sign her over to me if i paid for immigration attorney to keep him here in the united states. i told the court that it was equivalent to human trafficking, and that with her emotional issues, that it was the wrong thing to do to send her, essentially, to another world that she doesn't know. >> what is your worst fear here? listen, we do know that people with felony convictions in many cases, obviously, are allowed to keep their children. a conviction does not mean that you are not going to be able to care for that child, particularly if it's not an offense against that child, but what is your worst fear as her grand mom knowing that in the end she could end up there with this man? >> if, you know, i believe ev
dissonant. with that part of your thinking going in? that you wanted to create this environment that was not like happy feel-good music? the whole job from my point of view is to take you up in space with ryan and the lead character. if she was feeling overwhelmed, we needed the audience to feel like that. you look at everything you could do. always following the story and taking the audience on the journey. a let me ask you about being composer nowadays. did you think as a kid you were going to grow up and be a composer, or do you see that as the best outlet for you to now?ss creativity in music >> the main music was a thing from very young. anded to love songwriting that kind of thing. and in their early 20's i got my first job with a film composer. it was only when i started moving music around that i realized what is it could do to a story and this light went on. it after youte see a video or sometimes after you see a clip? >> sometimes you have a few thematic ideas. for me, it is always when the movie is there and you can see the performances. all of these different things
and hot environment. when people die outside, they can mummify or become skeletal quickly. >> this was lying in the desert for probably more than a year. maybe one to five years. >> our anthropologists can help with information that we can't get from an autopsy. >> like reading the bones, some people say. >> but all too often the bodies are not identified. >> what happens to remains when we finish our investigation is they're buried or cremated. >> and this is where they finally end up. in a dusty section of the county graveyard in a kind of giant filing cabinet. a monument to the ashes of the unknown and unclaimed. >> a moving story. our thanks to vocative for the work on it. that wraps things up for me. it's my favorite time of day, t "the reid report" with my favorite colleague, joy reid. stay tuned. she can print amazing things, right from her computer. [ whirring ] [ train whistle blows ] she makes trains that are friends with trees. ♪ my mom works at ge. ♪ [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the nex
the same way as ubs? what is the future for this bank and the environment you just described? i think it is not necessarily a great idea to focus the entire business on private banking. profitability and margins are under pressure. for credit suisse it is a big advantage they have managed to preserve such a large part of their investment banking. it is comfortably covering its cost of capital. count himselfcan lucky that they still have this investment bank and that they have more diversified earnings. credit suisse is not in such a bad position. it is cheap compared to other swiss banks. >> thank you for your analysis, joining us from kepler cheuvreux from frankfurt. crime pays. brazil may have some of the world's best beaches. it is the king of car crime. auto theft revving up business for one company. it is coming up next. ♪ welcome back.g, you are watching "the pulse," live on bloomberg tv and streaming on bloomberg.com. let's take a look at today's hotshot. to get anvils decide unconventional tour of rio de janeiro. .hey flew by the giant statue check out this shot, it shows yo
that type of an environment. hopefully that will improve. >> great to hear your thoughts, daniel morris from tiaa-cref's asset management. >> thanks for getting up early, appreciate it. >>> still to come, the closing keynote address at the world congress. >> the keenly awaited speech right after the break. [ male announcer ] whether it takes 200,000 parts, ♪ 800,000 hours of supercomputing time, 3 million lines of code, 40,000 sets of eyes, or a million sleepless nights. whether it's building the world's most advanced satellite, the space station, or the next leap in unmanned systems. at boeing, one thing never changes. our passion to make it real. ♪ >>> welcome back to the show. facebook and samsung have been in the main newsmakers so far at this year's mobile world dmong barcelona. the social network ceo defended his what's app acquisition and attention turns to data and cloud computing ahead of ib ibm ceo's keynote address. jon forte is live, what should we look out for? >> reporter: this should be big data day here in barcelona. we've had cisco ceo john chambers, joe tuche from emc m
, the largest military installation in the nation with a testing and training environment that is unmatched anywhere -- anywhere in the world. additionally, new mexico's national guard employs roughly 3,800 full- and part-time military earn he will. collectively, there are 18,000 military personnel serving today in new mexico. volunteerism isn't simply a career choice for new mexicans. it is a way of life. it is ingrained in our state's rich -- it is ingrained in our state's rich history of putting country first. the bill before us renews our promise to all of them. to all of those who are willing to day down their life for their country. it provides benefits to all generations of veterans and their families, and it eliminates the cost-of-living adjustment penalty on military retirees. the legislation incorporates bills and ideas from both democrats and republicans to address the disability claims backlog, including one of my own. across new mexico i have heard from too many veterans who are frustrated with the delays they experience in receiving their disability benefits. last june senator
to 500. we don't have the same touch or nurturing environment. we'll get back and improve the outcomes. >> i want to take the moment to remind the viewers that morehouse targets the nurterring of young african american men. you and i know that there are class lines. asian students led with 81% graduation followed by white 80%, lat eachios 68 and blacks 62% - graduating high school, how do you think the president's initiative will narrow the gap. >> i want to absentuate that a bit. it starts with low reading lels. it's worse far african american males. 86% read below reading levels. it's no surprise that one in three go to prison. there's a cradle to prison pipeline. what we are trying to do is caning that, shift it from a cradle to prison so cradle to power pipeline. morehouse will have a lot to do with that. what the president announced is significant. it's a tie with the philanthropic community. that's where you saw the 200 million injected into this scenario. and that is - there'll be a lot more. also, the federal government will take part in ensuring best practices there are proils
an environment, rapid inflation either. if you look at measures of the labor market, which it's getting harder to gauge as unemployment rate comes down, there are signs of under utilization, marriagely attached whatters, part time for economic reasons and that represents hidden slack in the labor market, and it will keep down pressure on overall core inflation. >> the last two jobs reports were disappointing, hard to predict. how do you go about making a model for friday's job number? >> it is not easy because trying to put weather variables in models have been frustrating. our baseline forecast is below consensus, we're at 115,000. we tended to focus a lot on the weather conditions during this survey week and they were poor, with a snowstorm that hit the east coast, particularly the southeast had a big shutdown in activity. we think that will result in weakness in the headline number. but as you suggest, there's a big rhyme for air flr this month's payroll number. >> 150, looks like consensus. >> they're the low on the street, aren't you? 115 are you at, that is right? >> we're not the low bu
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)